Documentation

  • Introduction
  • Left Table Part: Game
  • Right Table Part: Deed
  • The Deed Lightbox

Questions

  • General
  • Game Table

Web Site

  • Changes
  • Logos

Links

  • Partners

Introduction

The Game Table

GameDeed is a list of games where the left part is a mini database (the game) and the right part your personal checklist and backlog (the deed).

game table

It was launched in August 2013 and has since been expanded with a ton of games, Steam import, various screenshot galleries, in-site Wikipedia articles, and more. You can register and add not only deeds, but also new games (if they're not already present in the database).

The general design philosophy of the site is that all games and their information are always shown as table rows. There are no other screens or windows that the site will flip to. Instead, each game row has a big ExpandSpace button that may open various additional stuff.

A little bit like when clicking pictures in Google Images.

expandspace

Furthermore, the table offers all kinds of crazy filtering, just by clicking on almost anything. Want to filter by release year? Just click a release year in any game row and all rows now shown will share that exact year. Want to see all games that are 5 hours long? Find just one game that long and click its colorful length bar. Now all games shown will be that long. Clicking the aggregator review rating will open a new web browser tab, but otherwise that's the gist of it.

Using the Game Table

The game part of the table is always available, you don't have to be logged in for that. These games are also shared among all users, so if you log in and add a new game in order to add a deed to it, other users will eventually also be able to see that game. Furthermore, users doing a Steam synchronization may automatically add a bunch of games from Steam. The latter is also the reason why the site covers so many Steam games.

Note that the game table images show the web site on a widescreen display. If the width of your web browser is less than approximately 1600 pixels, some information may be condensed and a column in the deeds area will even be hidden. If you're using a desktop computer, I recommend maximizing your web browser window to always see the full widescreen version of the web site.

The game table defaults to showing 50 rows per page. You can change this in View Settings when logged in.

GameDeed

First, let's check out what's available in the game part of the table – the one always shared by everyone.

Format

This is the format, also known as platform to some. It's also the only part of the table that's sticky.

format column

Normally, clicking an element in the table is temporary, meaning that clicking another will reset the previous one. For example, click a developer name to show games only made by that developer. Then click a genre button to cancel showing for a specific developer but instead show all games only in that genre.

Clicking a format, however, is sticky to help narrow down what you're looking for. So as soon as you've clicked, say, the Playstation 4 format, clicking on e.g. a developer name will show what that developer made for Playstation 4 only. This stickiness can be revoked by clicking a small RESET button above the table.

Note that clicking a format will also set the corresponding drop-down box above the table. The yellow color indicates that a specific format has been selected, and the padlock icon that it is sticky.

Game / Year / Developer

This is the game title along with first year of release and the developer.

game column

Year and developer relate to the format and thus may be different for other formats. Clicking a year or a developer will filter much as you would expect, but clicking a game name will do one of two things:

  1. If it's a solitary game, it will search its own name. If you are viewing multiple formats (the default) this will show all the formats the game was made for.
  2. If it's part of a series, the series will be displayed and the corresponding drop-down box above the table will also be set. Sorting within a series is often special in that games will typically be listed in a chronological order rather than alphabetically. Individual formats will always huddle together first, though.

A game can also be an indented child – a DLC, a MOD, or an expansion. If the parent game is present in the list too, it will have a branch that reaches up to it. It can also be a compilation of multiple games. All these exceptions show an additional icon. You can even click this too, if you want to filter according to this child type.

children

One particular type that needs an explanation is the Trivial DLC. This is an idea I had to make it easy for you to tell these two distinct types of DLC apart.

meat dlc
This is a DLC with actual new playable content. Levels, chapters, areas – stuff that actually expands the game with more story and content.
trivial dlc
This type of DLC is more of an accessory. It can be a new weapon, a new car, a suit of armor, etc. Think horse armor for Oblivion.

If you hover a mouse pointer on a game title, you can see what series it's part of when relevant. You may sometimes also see when the game was added to the database. A rare once in a while you may even see what save system the game uses, like checkpoints or saving anywhere. (This last bit of information was once a column in the table, but it was removed because the information for it was extremely hard to find.)

tooltip

Sometimes there are extra stuff appended to the developer name. A skull icon means that the developer is defunct (so you shouldn't expect to see anymore games from them) while an arrow to a new name indicates a renaming or transfer to a new developer name or company. The latter has been connected too; clicking a renamed developer will always show a list of games before and after the renaming took place.

developer icons

Length

If a length has been registered for a game, it may be shown here.

length column

Only one value is shown as sort of an approximate "combined" length to give you an idea of how long you should expect to be playing it. Some games, especially RPG, can be very long. The table accepts the bar to be as wide as all the way to the Format column. It just gets darker and the game title will still be readable on top of it.

morrowind length

Some open world multi-player games, typically MMO, may show an infinity symbol to indicate that the game is a persistent world, i.e. not a game you would expect to complete like you would a single-player game. Some of the same type of games may have had servers that are now shut down, in which case the column may show a stop symbol and the year it was terminated.

other length types

Genre

genre column

The genre box is pretty much what you would expect and uses different colors for the primary genre, like green for adventure games and blue for shooters. A box has a primary and a secondary genre type, and clicking it will list all of the primary genre type. (If you want to see strictly the primary and secondary type together only, hold down the Ctrl key before clicking the box.)

The genre types shown are for the most part the stuff you are probably already used to on the internet. However, there are a few exceptions where I have tried to twist a few conceptions to see if I could improve upon it. I'll leave it up to you to determine whether they were good ideas:

  • A walking simulator is called a facile adventure instead. Dear Esther is a good example of a facile adventure.
  • The term rogue-like and its variations are never used. Instead, the site concurs with the suggested PDL alternative. I admit it may not always fit perfectly, but it's still better than that awful rogue-like nonsense.
  • An FPS with a little smattering of RPG on top is called an FPS+. Same deal with 3PS+. So, Deus Ex is an FPS+.
  • If it's an FPS with a ton of fast enemies all over the place, it's a frantic FPS. Serious Sam and Painkiller are good examples.
  • A difficult game that requires top notch reaction skills may use twitch as the secondary genre. This is most commonly seen with platformers. A good example of a twitch platform game is Super Meat Boy.
  • A tower defense game is typically listed as a defense strategy game, but again I admit this one is very much open for debate.
  • Games like Minecraft (and the ton of clones) are usually listed as a sandbox simulation game.
  • A match-3 puzzle game is a matching puzzle game.
  • Adventure games where you slide panoramic views, either sideways or in a 360° sphere, is called a node adventure because you tend to move around the game world node by node. Great examples are the first four games in the Myst series.
  • Fighting and brawler games kind of veered off track. Some use fighting as primary or secondary genre, some use beat 'em up as the secondary one. This could probably use a spring cleanup.
  • A rare once in a while a game offers so may different genres that it just received the primary genre multiple.

There may be other deviations, and they may of course all change over time.

Modes

Here you can see whether a game supports single-player mode (SP), competitive multi-player (MP), or co-operation play (CO). And not only that – various colors are also used to indicate the gameplay type of connection.

modes column

GameDeed generally adheres to the logic that co-operative teams against other co-operative teams is still competitive. So whenever a CO icon is present, it should mean that the game offers true, non-competitive co-operation.

What the colors of the icons mean:

 
The game has single-player
 
You can solo up to the level cap (typically used for an MMO such as e.g. World of Warcraft)
 
Single-player is multi-player with bots (typically used for games with focus on multi-player)

 
The game has single-player that must be played online (for example Diablo III)
 
The blue dot (indicating online play) can also be used on the other colored icons

 
The game has MP/CO but how it actually works is not yet determined
 
The game has MP/CO but only on a single device (hotseat/couch, same or split screen)
 
The game has MP/CO in a local network (LAN, System-Link, NetBIOS, IPX, null-modem, etc.)
 
The game has MP/CO on a single device or in a local network (you can choose either one)

 
The game has online play (i.e. connect to the internet)
 
The blue dot (indicating online play) can also be used on the other colored icons

If you have a mouse pointer, you can hover it on an icon to see a tooltip explaining it. Or you can open the drop-down box above the table for descriptions.

Generally the gray version of the mode icon is sort of a fallback, at least for MP and CO. If one of these are gray, then the proper detailed information about the gameplay type is not recorded. So, it's indeed MP or CO – but exactly how it works is not certain.

Filtering by one of these icons is one of the strong points of the web site. If you click e.g. an MP icon, all the games that have competitive multi-player will be listed, regardless of how this works in the game (i.e. all icon colors are included).

But you can also be even more specific. For example, you can find a game that supports a single device (so the MP and/or CO icon is yellow) and click it while holding down Ctrl (or just select it in the drop-down box above the table) and boom, you have a list of only the games that have couch gameplay.

Aggregator

This column may show an aggregator review rating or a more specific one for certain formats.

If it's an aggregator review rating, it's either from GameRankings or from Metacritic. It's always easy to tell these apart - the one from GameRankings is strictly blue while the one from Metacritic uses their typical red, yellow and green colors.

aggregator column

Whenever both rating types are available for a game, GameDeed always choose to show the one for Metacritic. The reason for this is that Metacritic has a very sensible rule of only showing a rating when at least four review sites have been included. This makes their ratings reasonably trustworthy.

GameRankings doesn't have this rule and sometimes a rating from just one review site may actually be unnaturally biased. The site is still quite useful, however, because they sometimes go much further back in time – way before Metacritic was conceived.

For Steam games (mostly Windows), there may be a user rating icon - a blue thumbs up for positive, a brown for mixed, or a red thumbs down for negative. To see the precise rating, open the ExpandSpace (more about this below) and select the Steam gallery.

And for a Commodore 64 game, there may be a cyan box with a review rating from the old Zzap!64 magazine. Click this to open a browser tab with a scan of the original review (courtesy of The Def Guide to Zzap!64).

Clicking a rating box is one of the few exceptions to filtering. Instead of filtering, it opens the relevant site in a new web browser tab. If you want to huddle the ratings together, click the table header Agg to sort instead.

ExpandSpace

This is what I call the ExpandSpace button. Click it to expand an area around the game row with additional information. Here you can read the Wikipedia article or look at screenshots from GameDeed itself (i.e. locally) or externally from Steam or Giant Bomb.

The Wikipedia article and the screenshots from Steam and Giant Bomb are obtained via an API – so the information is always fresh.

expandspace column

This requires that the information or screenshots for the game actually exists, however. If they don't, the tabs will just be disabled.

What the lights and banners on the ExpandSpace button means:

No tabs are available, so the only thing you can do here is edit/delete deeds (and sometimes games).
A Wikipedia article is the only tab available and it will be shown when clicked.
Local screenshots are available and will be shown when clicked.
Screenshots from Steam are available and will be shown when clicked.
Screenshots from Giant Bomb are available and will be shown when clicked.
A Wikipedia article and local screenshots are available. Defaults to Wikipedia first.
A Wikipedia article and screenshots from Steam are available. Defaults to Wikipedia first.
A Wikipedia article and screenshots from Giant Bomb are available. Defaults to Wikipedia first.

As an extra nifty bonus, right-clicking the ExpandSpace button should show a context menu with useful external links. Some will open directly for that game while others will attempt to search for it first. These links always open in a new web browser tab.

context menu

GameDeed

Past the thick gray vertical line we move into the deeds. You don't necessarily have to login to see some action here – you can observe deeds from other users too. Here's how you do that:

  1. Click a user row in the user list above the table and then the small User tab below. Or just double-click the user row. Same thing.
    clicking a user
  2. A selected user and her deeds is a very contextual thing. So if she has deeds for any of the game rows you were already looking at, they will show up for those immediately. But if you're looking at the New Games tab and new games were just added, chances probably are that nothing will happen yet.
  3. Instead, click any of the colored status labels in the right side of the user box. If you click ALL DEEDS, you will see a list of all the games this user have added deeds for. And as always, you can click elements in the deeds area of the table to narrow it down further.
    clicking a user
  4. Select another user to scrutinize, or if you wish to return to the original state, click the RESET button in the left side box.

If you wish to manage your own deeds, you have to log on first. You can do this in two different ways:

  1. As a Local GameDeed user. Click the REGISTER menu link and fill in the data. Your e-mail address will be used to confirm the account, but I assure you it won't be used for anything else. I won't pass it on or spam you with newsletters. You have my word.
  2. If you have a Steam account, just click the green button in the top right corner to log on with it. This process is easier as it doesn't require any registration here, and the only thing I get is a public ID number so I can read e.g. your username and profile picture.

You can even see whether other users have logged on using a Local or a Steam account. A small Steam icon is shown next to a name in the user list box (see the image above) if that person logged on via Steam. Not that it's particularly useful, but there you go.

All fields in the deed area are completely optional. When adding a deed, you are free to skip anything you find unnecessary – even the status label. You can also choose to hide certain columns so that only you can see them when you're logged in. Go to the Privacy Settings to manage this.

Editing a deed is done using a lightbox. See The Deed Lightbox if you want to read more about this now.

Status

This is the most important part of your deed. A status label indicates your progress within a game, and GameDeed makes sure have a lot to choose from. A short flavor text can also optionally be set beneath it. The flavor texts available may change contextually depending on the status label chosen.

status column

Typically the flavor text can be a static comment like e.g. "An excellent game!" or "A flawed gem", but for most labels you can also choose to indicate number of sessions played, and/or time spent in hours and minutes. Or you can replace the flavor text with a progress bar instead.

The following status labels are available:

indicates that you have tried the game but then abandoned it. Maybe you didn't like it, or the save games got lost and you couldn't be bothered to do it all over again. There's a number of reasons to choose from among the flavor texts.

indicates that the game is in your backlog. There are a few specialized flavor texts available here to indicate whether you want it, already own it, or have it installed and ready to play. BACKLOG labels also change the way the Rating column is perceived, effectively turning it into a priority column with blue numbers instead. The My Backlog tab will show these backlog entries with 1 in top – the ones you're most eager to play.

indicates that you have completed the game. If you choose to display a progress bar instead of flavor text, the label immediately changes to read MASTERED instead, to show how much of e.g. the optional collection stuff or world quests you have covered. The idea is that when a mastered game reaches 100%, you have seen and done everything that is possibly offered by the game.

indicates that you have played the game for a while but then paused it. You intend to return later, but maybe you're not sure. Can be used for all genres, but probably most useful for an MMO.

indicates that you are currently playing this game these days. As with COMPLETED, you can even add sessions and time spent so far.

indicates that you have played the game for a while, then stopped. This is intended to be used for persistent games with no actual end, such as an MMO. Use this label to indicate that you're done with the MMO and have moved on.

indicates that maybe you once played this game but you're not sure. This is a good label to use when you add a deed for a game several decades old, back from where things are not quite clear in your memory anymore. There are even flavor texts available specifically for this. The label also kind of excuses that a lot of data is missing in your deed.

Dates

This may show when you started playing the game, and when you stopped or completed it. All date elements (years, months, days) are optional. Any partial fields not used will just show question marks in their place instead.

dates column

The full dates are set in the lightbox, but only the month and year can be seen in the column. Hover the mouse on a date field to see the full date there.

You can use these dates any way you like. Personally, I use them to span the absolute start and end of a game. So the start date is the absolutely first time, I've ever touched the game, and the end date indicates my final goodbye. But that's just my personal use of them.

It can sometimes be a very good idea to click the Dates table header to show the chronological order of your deeds. Click it once to show the oldest ones first. Click it again a second time to show the newest. Those are the games you've played most recently.

Clicking any of the start or end dates for filtering will always affect the entire year.

Difficulty

Here you can set a difficulty from 1 to 5, with 1 being easiest and 5 being hardest.

difficulty column

Use this field to indicate how difficult you generally thought the game was when you played it.

Cheat

The amount of cheating you did to overcome the game is shown here. 0 is none, 1 is reading tips, 2 is partially, and so on. Cheating can be reading spoilers, reading a walkthrough, using cheat codes, or utilizing a trainer. Anything goes.

cheat column

Note that this column is not shown in the smaller version of the web site, i.e. if you're using a web browser with a smaller width than 1600 pixels.

1-10

This is most commonly used as your rating of a game, with 1 being awful and 10 being awesome.

rating column

The field is used as rating for most status labels. However, if you set the status label to BACKLOG, the field changes into a priority setting with blue numbers instead, with 1 being most important and 10 meh. Your list of backlog entries in the My Backlog tab is even sorted with priority 1 in top.

Property

property column

This might be better understood as the ownership. Whether you own it on Steam, as a retail box, on GOG, as a cartridge, etc. You can even state if it was a loan, if you lost it, if it was a rental, or if it was a gift. Lots of options here.

The Deed Lightbox

The lightbox for deeds is used both for adding a new deed as well editing an existing one. All fields in the deed part of the table are available here. There's a preview row to see how the changes will end up in the table, and you can copy settings from another deed.

deed lightbox

Editing a deed

There are actually three ways you can start editing a deed – one indirect and two direct:

  1. The indirect way is to click the ADD DEED button just above the table. When opened, select the Format and then the Game. This enables the controls below them. This method is useful if you want to edit a deed but don't want to bother finding the game in the table first.
    selecting a game
  2. The fastest way to do it directly is to find a game row in the table, then hover on the row for half a second. Small icons should now appear in the right side just outside the table. Click the gray icon there to start editing a deed for this particular game row.
    edit a deed
  3. The other direct way is much more convenient on a mobile device. Again, find a game row in the table, but this time just click the big ExpandSpace button. In the right side of the expanded area just above the game row, there's an Edit Deed link you can click.
    edit a deed

The two direct methods won't allow you to change the format and game on the fly. If you want to edit a deed for another game, you have to first exit the lightbox. This was prevented to speed up the lightbox, which may be quite important when editing a lot of deeds. If you want to be able to change the format and game in between edits, you have to invoke the lightbox with the ADD DEED button just above the table.

Deleting a deed

You can't delete a deed inside the lightbox, but there are two direct ways much akin to the ones in the previous section for editing a deed. First, find the game row in the table with the deed you want to delete. Then:

  1. Hover on the row for half a second. Small icons should now appear in the right side just outside the table. Click the red cross icon there to delete your deed for this particular game row. You will see a dialog box to confirm the choice.
    delete a deed
  2. Click the big ExpandSpace button. In the right side of the expanded area just above the game row, there's a Delete Deed link you can click. This method is much more convenient on a mobile device. Again, you will see a dialog box to confirm the choice.
    delete a deed

Regarding the game database, it is completely safe to delete your deed. Deeds have their own separate table on the server, so you can't accidentally delete anything in the game part of the table. That part is controlled by a different lightbox altogether.

Using the lightbox

If you opened the lightbox by clicking the ADD DEED button, you can edit the Format and then the Game drop-down boxes to specify which game you want to edit a deed for. However, if you opened the lightbox using one of the direct game row methods, these two drop-down boxes will remain disabled. (The format and game currently being affected will still be shown.)

Status

First, select a status in the Label drop-down box:

select status label

The following status labels are available:

indicates that you have tried the game but then abandoned it. Maybe you didn't like it, or the save games got lost and you couldn't be bothered to do it all over again. There's a number of reasons to choose from among the flavor texts.

indicates that the game is in your backlog. There are a few specialized flavor texts available here to indicate whether you want it, already own it, or have it installed and ready to play. BACKLOG labels also change the way the Rating column is perceived, effectively turning it into a priority column with blue numbers instead. The My Backlog tab will show these backlog entries with 1 in top – the ones you're most eager to play.

indicates that you have completed the game. If you choose to display a progress bar instead of flavor text, the label immediately changes to read MASTERED instead, to show how much of e.g. the optional collection stuff or world quests you have covered. The idea is that when a mastered game reaches 100%, you have seen and done everything that is possibly offered by the game.

indicates that you have played the game for a while but then paused it. You intend to return later, but maybe you're not sure. Can be used for all genres, but probably most useful for an MMO.

indicates that you are currently playing this game these days. As with COMPLETED, you can even add sessions and time spent so far.

indicates that you have played the game for a while, then stopped. This is intended to be used for persistent games with no actual end, such as an MMO. Use this label to indicate that you're done with the MMO and have moved on.

indicates that maybe you once played this game but you're not sure. This is a good label to use when you add a deed for a game several decades old, back from where things are not quite clear in your memory anymore. There are even flavor texts available specifically for this. The label also kind of excuses that a lot of data is missing in your deed.

A status field can also have a flavor text below it. This is optional but very recommended. You can select one in the Icon and Text drop-down box:

select flavor text

These flavor texts are somewhat contextual depending on the status chosen. This is easiest to see if you choose the BACKLOG status. Now you can only choose among four texts, most of which are unique to this status.

Some of the flavor texts have "#" markers on them. This indicates that you can add numbers to them. For example, choosing "# sessions[, # #h]" enables edit boxes below. Type number of sessions (think "sittings") and optionally number of hours and minutes. There's also a "Time: #h #m" for hours and minutes only, in case you're not interested in number of sessions. (The latter is also used by the Steam synchronization.)

select sessions and time

Instead of setting a flavor text with the Icon and Text drop-down box, you can choose to show a progress bar instead. Click its radio button and a progress bar is now shown in the preview row.

select progress bar

The progress bar simply indicates how much of the game you believe to have completed so far, but it has a special meaning if you set this for the COMPLETED status label. It immediately changes to MASTERED instead, to show how much of e.g. the optional collection stuff or world quests you have covered. The idea is that when a mastered game reaches 100%, you have seen and done everything that is possibly offered by the game.

Dates

Optionally set here when you started playing the game, and when you stopped or completed it. Any partial fields not used will just show question marks in their place instead, which is useful if you only remember, say, the year you completed this game.

select dates

A small trick – if you click the text label just left of the check boxes, it enables the entire line of them, ready for input.

You can use these dates any way you like. Personally, I use them to span the absolute start and end of a game. So the start date is the absolutely first time, I've ever touched the game, and the end date indicates my final goodbye. But that's just my personal use of them.

Verdict

Use the Difficulty field to indicate how difficult you generally thought the game was when you played it.

Set the amount of cheating you did in to overcome the game in Cheat. Cheating can be reading spoilers, reading a walkthrough, using cheat codes, or utilizing a trainer. Anything goes. Note that the Cheat table column is not shown in the smaller version of the web site, i.e. if you're using a web browser with a smaller width than 1600 pixels.

The Rating is usually your review rating from 1 to 10. However, if you choose BACKLOG, the field changes to Priority instead. Your list of backlog entries in the My Backlog tab is sorted with priority 1 in top.

And finally there's Property, which might be better understood as the ownership. Whether you own it on Steam, as a retail box, on GOG, as a cartridge, etc. You can even state if it was a loan, if you lost it, if it was a rental, or if it was a gift. Lots of options here.

select verdict

All these fields are completely optional. You could choose to only show e.g. your perceived difficulty rating for a game, and nothing else!

Ignored by Steam Sync

Normally, it's completely safe to change the status labels for your deeds (e.g. to COMPLETED) and then use Steam Sync again. However, there is one exception – BACKLOG is set to PLAYING if GameDeed detects playtime for it, and various time measurements may also be updated.

tick checkbox

But if you tick this check box, all future Steam synchronizations will not change these things either. The deed is completely ignored. This is especially useful if you're the kind of player that farms Steam cards by leaving games in an idle state.

Copying from another deed

It's possible to copy deed settings from another deed. The controls for this have been placed in the gray header of the lightbox. First, edit the deed for a game as usual, then choose the Format and Game in the header controls. As soon as you click the COPY button, all settings are copied into the deed controls, ready to be edited or accepted as is.

copy controls

There is no confirmation here, but you can always cancel the lightbox if you made a mistake.

The real power of this copying functionality is that the Format and Game settings are remembered in between lightbox sessions. This means that you can edit a number of deeds and just click COPY for each of all the subsequent ones. This can save a lot of time for samey deeds.

General

What is this site?

Please see this short introduction in the documentation.

Who made it?

My name is Jens-Christian Huus and I live in Denmark. If you have any comments or suggestions, you are most welcome to contact me via e-mail at chordian@gmail.com. You can also use one of the social icons in the menu bar. And I have a blog too.

Why do you need my e-mail address for registering locally?

It's used to confirm the account and make sure you're actually human, but I assure you it won't be used for anything else. I won't pass it on or spam you with newsletters. You have my word.

Note that you can also log in with a Steam account. This does not require any registration at this web site.

Is it safe for me to give you my Steam login information?

Don't worry, you're not giving me anything like that. When you click the green button you're sent to Steam's own sign-in page. After logging in, it sends you back to this web site with nothing but a public profile ID. I then use this ID to call a Steam API that returns your user name and your avatar image.

What resources have you used?

The site was made with PHP, jQuery and MySQL. It was not based on any framework, but I used the jQuery plugins Custom Content Scroller and Uniform. I also used a set of Flag Icons.

What web browsers are supported?

All the modern ones as well as Internet Explorer 8 and up. IE7 and below won't work.

JavaScript?

This web site makes extensive use of JavaScript.

Please enable JavaScript in your web browser and then refresh this page.